Dismissed Tech linebacker reinstated to team

Daniel Cobb has been reinstated to the Texas Tech football team after the Lubbock County Criminal District Attorney's office brought no charges against him following an Aug. 19 arrest on suspicion of felony burglary of a habitation.  AJ File Photo
AJ File Photo
Daniel Cobb has been reinstated to the Texas Tech football team after the Lubbock County Criminal District Attorney's office brought no charges against him following an Aug. 19 arrest on suspicion of felony burglary of a habitation.

Texas Tech linebacker Daniel Cobb, who was kicked off the team in August after being arrested, has been reinstated and can play this week, Tech coach Tommy Tuberville announced Monday.

Cobb was arrested Aug. 19 on suspicion of felony burglary of a habitation, but Tuberville said Monday the Lubbock County Criminal District Attorney's office brought no charges against him.

He rejoined the team Sunday.

"He's been cleared by the district attorney. No wrongdoing whatsoever," Tuberville said. "The kid's going to graduate in two months (after) three and a half years (at Tech) in business. Never gave us one bit of problem, but it cost him two and a half months of playing college football and six games.

"So I'm proud of what he stood for. He's worked hard to clear his name and been cleared a hundred percent."

Tuberville dismissed Cobb from the team the day of his arrest.

"When you do something like that or you're accused of something, my policy is to make sure that everything is above board and they have to clear their name," Tuberville said. "He's done it all on his own."

Cobb is a 6-foot, 219-pound junior from Killeen Ellison. He's had an unusual career at Tech in that he was the team's third-leading tackler last season with 70 stops, but dropped out of the two-deep both early last season and again this year in spring practice.

Last season, Cobb celebrated his 21st birthday with arguably the best game of his career, making a team-high nine tackles in the Red Raiders' 41-38 upset at then-No. 3 Oklahoma.

He turns 22 next week, days after the Red Raiders' game at TCU, when he could see his first playing time of the season.

"He's 100 percent innocent," Tuberville said. "We're glad to have him back on the team. That's pretty tough on a kid that age, that had never done anything wrong in his life in terms of crossing the line and then (being) accused of a felony and having to go through that himself. I can't imagine having to do that.

"He's back a hundred percent member of the team and will play this week. We're looking forward to Daniel being a part of it, and we're glad everything worked out."

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Thank God

I glad he has been cleared of any wrongdoing

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New Comment to AJ Boards

Sorry about the confusion on my prior post, now that I have the right comment posted to the right article on the right message board:

Glad to see 'Ole Tubbs plays it like they did in the good old days, if the good old days were in Nazi Germany where everyone was guilty until proven innocent.

Why wait for the police to actually do an investigation? Why wait for the DA's office to bring charges? It is so much easier to punish now and make sure the kids themselves work to put themselves above board.

Glad the young man fought the arrest and the truth came out but I certainly wouldn't want to go back to a man whose neck must have whip-lash from all his snap judgements based on half-truths.

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@ Rob S.

Thats Tubs policy even when he was at Auburn. You will get kicked off the team until you handle your situation. He's a no nonsense guy. He wants discipline on & off the field.

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The Policy Is Simply Wrong

This type policy was perfected in a fraudulent manner by one Kent Hance and a group of co-conspirators. Evidence: The conspirators forgot their e-mails were in the public domain. Oops.

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@Red

You are, of course, correct. But since Leach got a job that will pay him at least $10.5 million for five years work, and since the people who hired him are not going to cheat him out of his pay, I have decided Leach is OK. WE are the folks that are not OK because the perps of the wrongdoing continue to have full sway OVER US.

If the policy is right, then Tubs has to be suspended because he has been accused of defrauding his investors out of $1.2 million in Alabama. AND I DON'T WANT TUBS SUSPENDED, because Tubs gave us Kaufman.

There's something in the water in Lubbock, because wrongdoig in our program keeps rearing its ugly head.

HERE'S WISHING THE COBB KID WELL.

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Innocent until proven guilty

Innocent until proven guilty seems to be forgotten in modern America. Newspapers print arrest records instead of conviction records so the individual is guilty in the public's eye even if he is truly innocent. Now our government detains people without charges under the new Obama administration rule (NDAA) that repubs and democrats both voted on. We need to return to liberty!

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Rob S.

Rob,

Since when is the legal standard of "innocent until proven guilty," which applies in criminal trials, applied and the reigning principle dictating to other business and personal ventures? The standard is an extremely important one in our legal system and one that we must fight for, but there is absolutely no reason that the legal standard has to be applied to other ventures outside the courtroom.

In the days of the post-Sandusky scandal with so many other issues, including heavy sanctions to a number of high-profile college football programs because of their "lack of institutional control" and "promotion of a culture" involving criminal enterprise or even the suspicion or appearance of such, a coach who decides to divorce his program of criminal allegations and then welcome a vindicated player back into the fold with open arms is the right move and the safest one for the rest of the very large number of players for whom he is also responsible.

I am very happy for Cobb that he can now put this situation behind him and focus on the future, hopefully a bright one. Welcome back!

And Rob? Good luck in three weeks!

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Eric brings up an interesting

Eric brings up an interesting point, namely, get back to work! I can get away with this for three more weeks but not you.

In all seriousness, it goes to a broader mentality in the public population that poisons potential juror pools and lessens burdens of credibility for the state to prove. It creates the aurora that only guilty people are charged and the police never make a mistake so max out everyone on guilt and punishment. It is too tenuous a link between the justice system and real life to pretend like there is no effect.

And people are put on leave, or even better for them, paid leave, all the time pending the outcome of an investigation. Police departments all over the country do it. So does the State and Federal government, and since Texas Tech is an entity of the former, why is a paying customer of the college treated worse than the employees and administrators whose salaries he helps pay for?

The Sandusky reference is an over-reaction because you know there is a vast difference between actively seeking to conceal criminal behavior, and violating even more laws in the process, versus merely taking the time to verify the facts. Both situations are dependent upon the facts. Penn State had the facts that Sandusky was a pedophile and they covered that up. That is legally and morally wrong. Tubbs appears to have not had the facts and decided to take action anyway, and in my opinion that is morally wrong. Which, as another commenter pointed out, this policy must not apply towards civil suits or all allegations of wrong doing otherwise Tubbs would dismiss himself since he is being sued for allegedly defrauding investors out of millions.

But we all know I defer to the greater knowledge on football so we can definitely agree its good he’s back on the team and I look forward to you proving me wrong and the team doing better than 5-7 again.

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Gangland Preparatory Academy

College football-- the official front group for gangsters and hoodlums. No reading or math skills required.

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If any of you actually worked

If any of you actually worked on the case and have sufficient evidence that the kid did anything wrong please share it with the board. Everyone that has lived or currently lives in Lubbock can testify that Lubbock Police are the type to shoot first and ask questions later. I'm not blaming the Lubbock Police but I do know the DA, and there had to be sufficient evidence to clear Cobb in this instance. Now you are going to blame Tuberville for giving the kid a second chance when he is proven innocent? I hope all of your bosses would allow you this much wiggle room if you were ever charged with a crime.

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Not Quite Sure....

Who you are talking to Red Raider, except for maybe Elsey, but the majority of comments seemed miffed that they did not give the kid the benefit of the doubt to begin with.

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Rob S.

Mostly talking to Red and Facts.

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Facts

point was that the kid was accused, like maybe a certain coach was accused of a wrong doing. That coach suspended the player prior to knowing all the facts. The person who could have suspended the coach when he was accused of wrong doing, didnt. However that person chose to suspend a different coach without the facts, then later fired that coach for (depending on the day of the week) a fill in the blank unsubstantiated reason. Not saying its right or wrong. But its the truth and ironically ironic.

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