Bruce Jones on playing every snap: 'We can't just tap our helmets and come out'

Texas Tech defensive coordinator Matt Wallerstedt second-guessed himself this week, saying he didn’t rotate his linebackers and cornerbacks enough in last week’s 20-10 victory against TCU.

Starting cornerbacks Bruce Jones and Ola Falemi played all 82 defensive snaps.

Jones shrugged it off, with some bravado.

“We did that,” he said. “We’re cornerbacks. We can’t just tap our helmet (signal for a replacement) and come out. You’ve got to be conditioned. You’ve got to be ready to run all day.

“On offense, receivers are going to go two plays. They’re going to switch. On defense, we don’t do that. We work harder to make sure we can play those 82 plays.

“They said this week we’re going to try to do some things to rotate us in and out, but I don’t mind not being rotated out.”

Jones said his calves “would get a little tight” late in the game. No big deal, as far as he was concerned, but coaches detected a little dropoff.

“They didn’t feel like we were moving around enough, trying to disguise as much as we did in the first three quarters,” Jones said. “So they take that as us being more tired.

“That does take a little toll. We do need to still be moving around and active as much in the first as in the fourth, so I understand where he’s coming from.”

Tech limited TCU quarterback Trevone Boykin to 194 passing yards, with a long gain of 22 yards. The Horned Frogs went 3-of-16 on third down and punted seven times, which Jones said provided enough breathers as needed.

“That’s all credit to our D-line and the scheme of the game,” Jones said. “When it was third-and-long, we were able to go to our two-man-under (coverage) with a little spy and then let the three-man rush go and the spy in the middle (linebacker), and that worked the majority of the time. That was all credit to the D-line and a good job by the DBs to be able to lock up when we needed to.”

Jones has mostly played boundary cornerback, to the tight side of the field, and Falemi the field cornerback to the wide side. Jones fits the boundary because he’s powerfully built and strong in run support.

“In the spring, I really worked field a lot. That’s when I seemed to be getting a lot of my picks,” Jones said. “I kind of wonder how it would be if I was over there, but I like being to the boundary, too, to help on run support.

“Most teams put their best receiver to the boundary and take the one-on-ones most of the time.”

 

  • Comment