Isaiah Austin's career ended by medical condition (Krista Pirtle's Blog)

Baylor's Isaiah Austin had a dream that in three days he would finally be part of an NBA roster.

According to scholarshipstats.com, there were 5,370 student athletes who played NCAA Division I men's basketball in 2013. There are currently only 450 athletes maximum in the NBA. 

Austin had been projected as a second round pick in Thursday's draft. Unfortunately, his name has recently been connected with something of slimmer odds.

Only 1 in 5,000 people are diagnosed with Marfan syndrome. And Austin is one of them after undergoing genetic testing as part of preparation for the NBA Draft.

"They told me that my arteries in my heart are enlarged and that if I overwork myself and push too hard that my heart could rupture," Austin told ESPN's Holly Rowe.

According to the Marfan Foundation, Marfan syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects the body's connective tissue. Connective tissue holds all the body's cells, organs and tissue together. It also plays an important role in helping the body grow and develop properly. 

This past season, Austin revealed that he has been blind in his right eye since he was 16 after suffering a retinal detachment and four subsequent surgeries. He was expected to the be the first to ever play in the NBA while partially blind.

Austin played two seasons at Baylor and averaged 12.1 points, 6.9 boards and 2.4 blocks in 28.9 minutes per game. His 119 blocks last season led the Big 12 Conference. 

"His health is the most important thing," Baylor coach Scott Drew said in a statement. "While it's extremely sad that he won't be able to play in the NBA, our hope is that he'll return to Baylor to complete his degree and serve as a coach in our program."

While it's unknown what the finance major will do right now, the important thing is that Austin is remaining postive.

"Woke up today blessed. I feel God's healing hands around me. Love the support you have all been giving me. Never forget, God is great," Austin tweeted Monday morning.

Even though his name won't be called on Thursday evening, Commissioner Adam Silver invited him to attend the Draft as his guest. 

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